morgandawn: (Default)
 Last year I found an IFTT recipe that allows me to cross-post from Tumblr to Dreamwidth by tag (yeah!!).

Big problem - the method (which sends a properly formatted email to Gmail with then uses DW's post by email feature, strips out all the links and formatting.   Is there any way we can post by mail to DW using Richtext? 

Example: This is how the text was formatted when it was sent via Gmail to DW

For me, the next space is Dreamwidth – it is already fan friendly and has half of the features that I want.  And for the other half – well, if I want something, pay for it, right?  So, here is my plan of action:
1) 
buy a DW paid account, even though I don’t have any use for its current paid features.   Because its developers need money if I want them to improve the site.  (And heck, I pay much more for Netflix.)
2) 
make some suggestions to DW for features that would make the site better.  (Top on my list: option to buy image hosting, ease of posting to different accounts, ability to reblog)
3) start consolidating my creative content on DW, and crossposting there.  (Maybe other people might slowly move there, as well, especially if the site is given the financial strength to improve.)
4) pay for fanart, fanfics, original writing, original art, etc.  Because the work we create is also worth something

This is how it appeared:

For me, the next space is Dreamwidth – it is already fan friendly and has half of the features that I want.  And for the other half – well, if I want something, pay for it, right?  So, here is my plan of action:
1) 
buy a DW paid account, even though I don’t have any use for its current paid features.   Because its developers need money if I want them to improve the site.  (And heck, I pay much more for Netflix.)
2) 
make some suggestions to DW for features that would make the site better.  (Top on my list: option to buy image hosting, ease of posting to different accounts, ability to reblog)
3) start consolidating my creative content on DW, and crossposting there.  (Maybe other people might slowly move there, as well, especially if the site is given the financial strength to improve.)
4) pay for fanart, fanfics, original writing, original art, etc.  Because the work we create is also worth something

edited: there seems to be little rhyme or reason to how the post by email "converts" (or does not convert).

I did find my older support request:


https://www.dreamwidth.org/support/see_request?id=31560

If you want to post by email, you have to manually hand code every email with html code or markdown. This severely limits the ability to use DW except via their web interface. The mobile email post method cannot be used to pass through emails with formatting intact so it limits my ability to allow DW to interact with the rest of the online services.
morgandawn: (Cat Basket Going To Hell?)
 So after much testing (and thank you to everyone who has helped and a special thank you to everyone who has not fled in horror), my plan for tumblr cross-posting is this:

Limit tumblr cross-posts to 1-2 a day, focusing on activism.  These posts will be tagged "activism" and if you have a paid DW account, you can filter them out.

Encourage everyone else to read my tumblr via the DW feed.      If you are on LJ, we have a feed there too.   My tumblr  has lots more fandom content and pretty pictures.  If you leave a comment at the RSS feeds, I won't be able to be notified, but I think that is a good compromise. 


morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/2hVhpH3 at January 05, 2017 at 08:29AM

potofsoup:

So, I had a shared blog on tumblr called learningtocomic, where me and a couple of friends would occasionally post things about our comicking shenanigans, and oftentimes use it as a platform for thinking through various aspects of the comicking process.  It had a respectable 200+ followers.

And then it got deleted due to tumblr stupidity.

That’s…. that’s a lot of content that has now disappeared into thin air.  I’m still waiting for a response from tumblr support before I go around salvaging what I can, but in the meantime, I’m thinking a lot about the content that we create here, for free, and put up on this here website.

Server space isn’t free.  Designing and maintaining a web platform isn’t free.  Any web platform needs developers to make it usable, support personnel to keep it a safe and sane space, and good management who actually considers our needs.  When a service is “free”, it means that at least one of those things is missing.  Tumblr doesn’t consider our needs.  LJ is poorly managed.  DW could probably use some more personnel, and has very little server space.

Right now, what with the LJ servers moving to Russia, and some predictions that the Russian company wants to gradually phase out the American (money-losing) side of LJ, I hear that many LJ people are decamping to DW.  With Yahoo basically in freefall, I think tumblr will die in a few years.  Already, various fandoms are going in different directions: imzy, discourse, etc.

Further fracturing of fandom aside, that doesn’t solve the problem that we keep expecting hosting and web platforms to be free.  Fandom, which generates a lot of free content (and accompanying wank), requires hosting and web platforms that aren’t free.  Because free actually means “our sales and marketing team is bigger than our development team”.  Free means “we are selling your information to the advertisers”.  Free means “oops we deleted all of your content but we don’t give a fuck because you’re not actually our customer.”

So we are faced with two options:
(1) migrate from site to site like digital vagrants, losing content and communities along the way, or
(2) pay.


I’m not saying that *everyone* has to pay.  Half of fandom are still in school, and another quarter are working 2 jobs and barely making ends meet.  But my experiences in fandom has also really shown me its generosity.  I recently was putting together a fan anthology, and had a payment process that was “pay what you can if you have financial trouble” coupled with “chip in $5 or $10 if you can help”, and the donations not only covered the people who couldn’t afford full price, but also covered incidental printing and shipping costs.

Which is to say – it’s doable, if we don’t take web platforms for granted.  If, when we migrate to the next place, we say “let us pay what we can” instead of diving straight into creating beautiful works of art (and then scrolling past the flame wars.)

For me, the next space is Dreamwidth – it is already fan friendly and has half of the features that I want.  And for the other half – well, if I want something, pay for it, right?  So, here is my plan of action:
1) 
buy a DW paid account, even though I don’t have any use for its current paid features.   Because its developers need money if I want them to improve the site.  (And heck, I pay much more for Netflix.)
2) 
make some suggestions to DW for features that would make the site better.  (Top on my list: option to buy image hosting, ease of posting to different accounts, ability to reblog)
3) start consolidating my creative content on DW, and crossposting there.  (Maybe other people might slowly move there, as well, especially if the site is given the financial strength to improve.)
4) pay for fanart, fanfics, original writing, original art, etc.  Because the work we create is also worth something. 



Tags:some of these may be borrowed tags, dreamwidth, alas, just after I'd moved back to LJ, good thing DW allows crossposting, jsyk -- if you report someone's blog, a careless tumblr support person might delete all of that person's blogs, even the completely unreleated blogs that they're a member of, fandom meta, potofsoup, fandom history, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/2dbCvmC at September 18, 2016 at 02:55PM

Beta Testers Needed: We’re exploring ways to expand the Media Fandom Oral History project into a DIY effort along the lines of Story Corps. What we’re looking for:

Two (or more) fandom friends willing (a) to interview one another (aka rambling fandom chats) and (b) to include their recordings into the existing oral history project

We need fans to test these methods

*Fans willing to chat with each another over phones using a conference call system

*Fans willing to chat with each another over Skype in connection with free recording software (we need people willing to test both PC and Mac)

*Fans willing to do chat with each another in person using free iPhone or Android recording software on their smartphones

Once done, you will upload the audio files into a Dropbox account. A permission form will also need to be signed by both parties and uploaded (scanned or photographed copies are fine).  There will also be a set of sample questions you can use.

Original Star Trek art by Caren Parnes, logo design by Morgan Dawn

Tags:fandom history, Oral History, media fandom oral history project, fanlore, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)

morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/24uTIMH at May 05, 2016 at 11:21AM

I consider myself to be a “middle era” slash fan. I entered slash fandom in the early 1990s at a time where queer activism was rising and the Internet was just taking off. By then slash fandom had a good 20 years already under its belt. But even in the 1990s, if you were gay and/or into slash, it was something you kept hidden from other fans until you were sure you’d be welcomed. Many women lived in fear of being outed to their families, children, employers or churches. And some were outed with predictable consequences. A lot of this is detailed on Fanlore: http://fanlore.org/wiki/Slash_Controversies

In my days of new-to-fandom, there was not much online slash fandom and few opportunities to find a slash community. If you posted about slash on Usenet, you were harassed. I was desperate to find slash fans and I located an old school Star Trek fan club in my area. I was welcomed by the group, invited into the club presidents home and offered a place at the table: but only if I could assure them I was not one of those filthy slashers. I said nothing and needless to say I did not return. Thankfully I found a slash mailing list (Virgule-L) and then the Internet happened and things changed.

Years later I ran into an early Star Trek fanzine publisher who told me that when she started publishing her slash zines in the 1980s, members of her local fan group had to swear they would not order the zine or take part in its production. Slash fanzine publishers were forced to stop selling their zines at fan conventions. Fans reported slash zine publishers to customs. Zines were seized by customs and fans had to explain in person why they were importing pornography. A fan in South Africa could not risk buying a slash zine, so the zine publisher and her friends mailed the fan 15 pages at a time, each from a different address. It is not surprising that many of the slash stories written and published in that era were written under a pseudonym. So persistent were the anti-slash fans, that after decades of being confronted with the same objections to slash over and over again, that slash fans wrote The Generic Slash Defense Letter.

The acceptance of slash within fandom has gradually lifted across fandom communities - but not everywhere and not for everyone. And the echoes of these incidents is something that many of us from that time - and the people who came immediately after us - still carry in their individual and collective consciousness. I look back now and shake my head in wonder. I also look to fandom today with gratitude that slash has become more accepted. And I look forward to tomorrow with the hope that we continue accepting it and the fans who read and write it.

Tags:fandom history, slash history, fandom meta, Star Trek history, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1PAracR at December 03, 2015 at 09:27AM

Yahoo mulls shareholder demand to sell Internet business:

Yahoo owns Tumblr.

What’s your tumblr backup plan?

Me at Dreamwidth.

My ‘backing up your tumblr’ posts

Possible tumblr alternatives


Tags:tumblr, dreamwidth, DWCrosspost, tumblr tools

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1H5vptK at November 16, 2015 at 05:45PM


 

Filk songs are a longstanding part of both media fandom and scfi-fi fandom history. Lyrics are often set to well known songs so that audiences can sing along. This filk song was performed in the early 1980s and released on the “Cosmic Connection” cassette tape.

THE TREKKER (to the tune of Simon and Garfunkle’s “The Boxer”)                  
(lyrics by Cheryl White & Jeanne Cloud)

image
Tags:filk, fandom history, the great broads of the galaxy, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Dr Who Fantastic kyizi)

Ever wonder what types of fanzines are being published today? 

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1kzkBdn at November 15, 2015 at 06:53PM


http://ift.tt/1kzkyOT


http://ift.tt/1kzkyOV


http://ift.tt/1kzkyOX


http://ift.tt/1kzkBdp


http://ift.tt/1kzkz5d


http://ift.tt/1kzkBdr


http://ift.tt/1kzkz5i


http://ift.tt/1kzkz5k


http://ift.tt/1kzkBdv


http://ift.tt/1Jmzc18
 

State of the Union: Fanzines

Ever wonder what types of fanzines are being published today? There are still many traditional print fanzines (just head over to Fanlore or click on my fanzine tag). But more recently, I’ve seen limited run art zines being produced. Kickstarter seems to be a popular way of funding these zines. I would have included more, but tumblr only lets me add a certain number of images.

Links to their Fanlore pages or their Kickstarter page below.

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Supernatural_Artbook (Supernatural)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Meat_Popsicle (Fifth Element, PDFs are still available)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/SPNIME (Supernatural Anime)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Standing_Still (Orange is the New Black, free e-zine on Isuu)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Banquet:_A_Hannibal_Artbook (see also the second vol: http://fanlore.org/wiki/Field_Kabuki:_Hannibal_Art_Book_Vol.2) (PDFs still available http://hannibook.tumblr.com/)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Brooklyn (Captain America)

http://fanlore.org/wiki/The_Sterek_Book (Teen Wolf)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1101071988/klaine-book-project-2014 (Glee)

http://misslucid.tumblr.com/tagged/hand-around-the-heart (Teen Wolf)

http://furyroadfanzine.tumblr.com/ (this is the one zine that has yet to be published, although they just concluded their Kickstarter fundraiser) (Mad Max Fury Road)
 

edited to add:

Not shown above: https://www.etsy.com/listing/211479850/loki-artbook-fanbook-sketches-loki-a?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=loki&ref=sr_gallery_24 (Thor, single artist) (copies still available)

http://avatarfanzine.tumblr.com/ (Avatar The Last Airbender)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/badinfluencepress/raw-a-hannibal-will-fanthology (Hannibal) (still accepting backers)

http://insufficientskillzine.tumblr.com/post/131784462111/insufficient-skill-a-dragon-age-zine-a (Dragon Age)

http://witnessmeartbook.tumblr.com/post/132501137963/its-the-announcement-youve-all-been-waiting-for (Mad max) (still accepting submissions)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1916440866/recapitulation-an-inktober-artbook (Captain America) (still open to backers)

Tags:fanzines, fandom history, fanlore, fanzine history, fanart, fan art, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)


Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1WGmIb3 at November 06, 2015 at 07:00PM
(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niRUpJEbVx4)

This vid was shown at Kiscon 2015.  The full list is here: http://ift.tt/1SqKyHa

Vidder: Estalita11

Tags:vidder:Estalita11, kiscon, vidrec, fanvid, vidding, kirk/spock, star trek, dwcrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1iFBsJK at November 05, 2015 at 08:00AM
 

 

stardust-rain:

All this leaving tumblr talk is making me hark back to the LJ days of old, man oh man.

some of the older fans here, who remember when we had to blog uphill both ways in the snow, will recall that The Great LJ Fan Migration didn’t just happen within a few months.

It took years for fandom to fully migrate and build a presence on the alternative site DreamWidth, and in between those years LJ made several fuck-ups that lead to its own demise, turning it into the fandom* ghost town it is now.

Brief history:

  • LJ is sold to SixApart in 2005. Previously ad-free for nine years and run by one guy named Brad Fitzpatrick, 6A monetised it, introduced ‘sponsored’ accounts in addition to basic, paid and permanent, which gives you ads in exchange for more features. It was annoying, but LJ had grown into a behemoth by then so it was understandable.
  • 6A then later sells to Russian company SUP in ‘07.
  • May 2007 was the first strikethrough. Fandom banded together, collectively shat on LJ staff for deleting an HP porn community pornish-pixies, along with several others, for alleged paedophilia and ‘violation of the TOS’. Several personal blogs and communities also got deleted and the uproar was huge. Deleted journals looked like this, hence the name. There is outrage, there is uproar, there are news articles, a BNF attempts and fails to burn a t-shirt.
  • People were already talking alternatives by then - InsaneJournal, DeadJournal and JournalFen being the most popular ones, but each had their own faults. JF was invite-only and 18+, DJ was extremely buggy and tended to break down and IJ was…ass-ugly (and ableist). Communities were scattered, there was some general shifting around and there was the beginnings of Scribblit, an fandom-oriented blog community, which didn’t really go anywhere. LJ had been active for 9 years, fandom had been present for around the same time, and people were reluctant to move. At the end of the day, not much changed.
  • But here’s the kicker of the whole shebang: SUP was planning to take LJ public. Strikethrough/boldthrough was them cleaning up the mess.
  • In August, three months later, it happened again only this time the deleted journals were bolded. There was more uproar, only this time people started talking seriously about moving.
  • Things are quiet for a year or two, but most people have lost trust in LJ staff. In this time: LJ disables basic accounts, changed the layout of the profile page, disables comment headlines which made kinkmemes a special sort of hell to navigate.
  • DreamWidth started its roots around early ‘09 with invite-only accounts for beta testing, run by previous staff split from the LJ board. This was the days before kickstarter and crowdsourcing, so it was kind of a big deal.
  • It wouldn’t be until 2011 that the platform would complete beta testing and open to membership. Biggest early comms are kink_bingo and scans_daily.
  • AO3 also start gaining users around this time.
  • The move to DW is gradual and took years. People dropped off the radar, lost contact, some people stayed - it wouldn’t be until late 2013 that DW and LJ would be on equal standing fandom-wise.
  • Parallel to this, Tumblr was getting popular and some people skipped DW altogether and just moved to Tumblr.

LJ is by now a ghost town, but it’s going to take years before any significant change in userbase will take effect and make a dent in Yahoo/Tumblr’s pocket.

All has happened before and will happen again etc etc, because when fandom makes a blogging platform grow in size, they will inevitably have to sell out and this eventually fucks its userbase over. Tumblr has an estimated userbase of 30-50 million, which is at least three times the size of LJ when it was bought.

I’m glad people are so optimistic about all this, but I also doubt that much is going to come from it.

I’m sure that people older than me, who moved from usenet to yahoo mailing lists and Geocities, have a lot more experience in this.

(*LJ is still the most popular blogging platform in Russia, let’s not forget. Just because fandom doesn’t reside there any more doesn’t mean it’s completely irrelevant.)

spartytoon:
I think a blogging platforms popularity is its ultimate downfall. More users = more bandwith, which means it costs more to operate. If you want to keep things running, you HAVE to monetize it. There’s no ifs ands or buts about it. You can’t expect something that’s all volunteer to work perfectly all the time, and really, you shouldn’t. I actually don’t think xKit guy should go to so much trouble to “fix” Tumblr. He doesn’t work for Yahoo, he’s not getting paid for it but Yahoo ultimately benefits from his hard work.

Fandom has had a long, sad history of not wanting to pay for things, and its very telling that the greatest rage swells up when platforms go after illegal (scanlations, fansubs and so on), and questionable content (all the porn) first. That’s ultimately what gets fandom to move: the lack of easy access to free stuff.

Tl;dr: blogging platform gets popular; becomes too costly to operate; clears out all of the illegal/questionable stuff; monetizes somehow (ads, usually); fandom gets pissed and leaves. Lather, rinse, repeat.
 

 


Tags:fandom history, fandom meta, livejournal, strikethrough, tumblr, the way of all flesh', DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1PnJUu5 at November 04, 2015 at 06:00PM

Strikethrough and Boldthrough - Fanlore:

spartytoon:

I think I’m gonna post some Fandom Drama stuff for a while here since I’m sick and tired of watching people repeat history. Because, trust me, these sorts of hijinks are nothing new. Also, don’t let the radfems fool you, women are usually just as depraved as men when it comes to fandom content and drama. Sometimes worse. Who am I kidding? Often worse.

Anyway, the Tl:dr is: LJ decided to monetize more of the site and bowed to a conservative Christian group, which largely involved them opening the basement doors and cleaning out all of the child porn. There’s a few things to keep in mind here…

- Livejournal has always been pretty heavily female dominated. By heavily, I mean, a community of 300 people would only have three to five guys in it. Seriously. Guys were like unicorns in LJ fandoms.

- Naturally, the purge pissed a lot of people off, and not just the people who were mistakenly axed. Porn depicting underaged characters has been a staple of fandom for some time, and much of the discussion in the above link is by women who were DEFENDING it as a harmless exploration of sexuality (since no actual children were involved, and at the end of the day it was all fiction/drawings (which I agree with, even though I detest the stuff).

- I am 100% certain that many of the women who once drew underaged characters in various fucked up situations now lead the charge against child porn. Likely because they now have children of their own, and have forgotten what they drew/wrote as teenagers.

- Oh yeah, a good portion of LJ’s most prolific NC-17/M rated artists and writers were teenaged girls. So it was often 15 year olds drawing or writing porn of 12 year olds. Boys, usually. Gotta have that shota.

- Something similar happened to DeviantArt but I haven’t located that rundown of events yet (if anyone even bothered to document it). Many people flounced and came to Tumblr where presumably they could post their pre-timeskip NaruSasu yaoi in peace (they’re 12, before the timeskip, btw - could hardly browse the Naruto tag without running across it).

- Where they were hounded again when Yahoo bought the site and decided to try to contain the porn, and crack down on the underaged stuff. Again, this heavily effected a lot of female fanartists, and people were generally pissed. But I’m guessing most of you don’t remember any of that, even though it only happened a few years ago.


Tags:fandom history, fandom meta, livejournal, strikethrough, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Mdnqrf at November 04, 2015 at 03:00PM
mizstorge:

Just about seven years ago, on 29 May 2007, hundreds of fans with accounts at Livejournal made the shocking discovery that their blogs, and those of some of their friends and favorite fandom communities, had been deleted without prior notice.

It’s estimated that Livejournal suspended approximately 500 blog accounts. The only notice of this was was the strike through the names of the suspended blogs, which led to this event being called Strikethrough.

At the time, Livejournal was the primary blogging platform for fandom. Its friends list and threaded conversations enabled fans to find each other and have discussions. Its privacy settings allowed fans to share as much or as little as they chose. It was a place to publish and archive fan fic, art, and meta. These features give some idea why the deletions of so many fandom blogs was devastating.

Speculation and uncertainty were rampant during the two days it took for Livejournal to finally respond to demands from users for information. At first, LJ stated only that it had been advised that journals listing an illegal activity as an interest could be regarded as soliciting for that illegal activity, which put the site at legal risk. It was eventually revealed that Livejournal and its owners at the time, Six Apart, had been contacted by a group calling themselves Warriors for Innocence, a conservative Christian organization with ties to the militia movement who accused of being a haven for pedophiles and child pornography.

LJ had based the account suspensions on the tags used in LJ blogs. LJ users list their interests in their profiles, and those interests functions as tags. LJ took the blanket view that there was no difference between blogs listing “rape”.”incest”, or “pedophilia” among their interests, and blogs with posts tagged “rape”. “incest”, or “pedophilia”. As a consequence, some of the accounts that were suspended were support sites for people like rape survivors and gay teens, as well as the fandom sites that posted book discussions, RP, fan fiction, and fan art.

Livejournal grudgingly issued a partial apology to users on 31 May, but it took months for the organization to sort through the suspended blogs. According to Livejournal, most of the suspended accounts were restored. Not all of the suspended accounts were restored, and some of those that weren’t belonged to the support groups and fandoms.

One result of Strikethrough was that many communities and individual fans locked their blogs so the content could be viewed only community members, or those on their friends lists. Other fans opened accounts at blogging platforms like JournalFen, The Greatest Journal, or Insane Journal. There was definitely an atmosphere of mistrust and paranoia that hadn’t previously existed, and part of the problem was that Livejournal had not come through with promised clarification about what sort of content violated the ToS.

So, of course, it happened all over again.

On 3 August, Livejournal once again suspended a number of accounts without warning. This time, the account names were bolded, and the event became known as Boldthrough.

These deletions were the result of decisions made by a group consisting of members of LiveJournal’s Abuse Prevention Team, made up of LiveJournal employees, and Six Apart staff, that had been set up to review blog content. This group was had been empowered to declare blog content offensive, a violation of the ToS that was defined by the team as content not containing enough serious artistic value to offset the sexual nature of the material. The team was empowered to terminate accounts without warning.

Anxious and angry LJ users had to wail ten days until LJ issued a response. Eventually, the ToS was changed to state that accounts deemed in violation of the ToS would in future be deleted only if the offender refused to delete offending content.

Just a few days before Strikethrough, LJ user astolat proposed a new blogging platform and fan fic archive be created by fans, for fans. This was the birth of the Organization for Transformative Works, a non-profit organization dedicated to provide access to fanworks, and to protect and defend fanworks from commercial exploitation and legal challenge. Strikethrough and Boldthrough definitely pushed the project along. OTW opened DreamWidth in beta mode in April 2009, and began open beta testing of Archive of Our Own in November 2009.

 The OP has issued a corrected version of her 2014 post and has also added the following:  

DreamWidth opened for business in the summer of 2008. DW was conceived by former LJ staff members who shared the vision of a journal site created by people who understand journal users because they are journal users, too. Like LJ, it is a for-profit business that features both paid and free accounts. Unlike LJ, DW is dedicated to being totally ad-free. From the outset, it was designed to be fandom-friendly, and the ToS do not restrict the type or appropriateness of content. Initially, invites were required to open an account. This was done to control how many new accounts were created at any given time, and to ensure that sufficent resources — hardware, bandwidth, and support — were available. The invite system encouraged former LJ users to bring along their friends, and helped to ease the transition of fandoms from LJ to DW. The invite system was discontinued in December 2011. 

In mid-January 2010, DreamWidth came under pressure by an undisclosed group who tried to convince DW’s server and PayPal, among others, that DW was a platform for child pornography. DW refused to give in to the harassment and intimidation, and promptly notifed users about the situation. The only consequence of the group’s pressure was that new requests for paid services were temporarily put on hold until DW was able to find a new payment processor service. DW remained true to its Guiding Principles by keeping users informed throughout this incident, and respecting freedom of expression by refusing to delete any posts or blogs to satisfy the demands of the group of trolls.

Which brings us to Tumblr.

Tumblr was launched in 2007. While not all fans have embraced it, citing reasons like character restrictions in replies and asks and the difficulty of finding others who share one’s fandom, it’s certain that the majority of fandoms are well-represented.

However, in July 2013, fans once again expressed outrage when Tumblr - without warning – removed without warning accounts flagged as “NSFW” or “Adult” from public searches, made those blogs inaccessible to Tumblr users not already following them, and deleted a number of tags from its mobile app, including #gay, #lesbian and #bisexual. In a manner unsettlingly reminiscent of Strikethrough and Boldthrough, Tumblr did not immediately respond, and the response posted 24 hours later was widely regarded as a non-apology apology. Tumblr claimed it had been trying to get rid of commercial porn blogss, and eventually asserted that all the removed accounts had been reinstated.

If there’s a lesson to be learned from this, it’s that of George Santayana: Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Most blogging and social networking sites are in business to make a profit, and fandoms make them uncomfortable. They inevitably take steps to control the content being posted, to keep outside groups or their new owners happy, disrupting fandoms and deleting material that fans had considered to be safely stored.

The only solution I can see is for fans to copy and back up the things that are important. Maintain active accounts at several sites. Keep a list of your friends’ pseudonyms and emails.

Because the only thing that’s certain is that it’s going to happen again.

I highly recommed A brief history of fandom, for the teenagers on here who somehow think tumblr invented fandom: by ofhouseadama.

I intend to make proper footnotes at some point, but until then, here’s a list of sources used in writing this article:

Read more... )

 

for-the-other-shoe:
Thoughtful summary and great collection of links.

One addition/correction: Dreamwidth is not an OTW project, though both OTW and Dreamwidth were developed by fans partly because of frustrations with LiveJournal, including but not limited to Strikethrough.


fanculturesfancreativity
A brief history of fandom, for the teenagers on here who somehow think tumblr invented fandom: by ofhouseadama.

Why this is important (READ IT ALL).
 

Meedeee:
One of the many reasons the OTW prospects like Fanlore and the AO3 matter. 


Tags:fandom history, otw, ao3, fanlore, Organization for Transformative Works, servers of our own, queued, DWCrosspost
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1QbRKHS at November 04, 2015 at 05:01AM
 

vieralynn:

My real problems with tumblr as a fandom platform:

1. No centralization, just a massive firehose of complete random stuff organized loosely via an ever evolving anarchy of tags.

2. Whenever a fandom appreciation week or meme month is announced, I only find out about it via happenstance because there is no single tag/blog to go to.

3. Stuff happens so fast that I cannot keep up even if I log in for 30-60 minutes most evenings of the week.

4. No way to easily find old posts that would interest me.

5. Ppl change their blog name at the drop of a hat, can no longer find old content from them. :C

6. What tag should I look under for something? No one can agree, especially for many ships.

7. Email notifications aren’t very good. Communication facilities are bad. Discussion facilities might as well not exist.

8. No way to filter my dash to only see content X vs content Y. (For instance, my short listed friends or only the announcement blogs).

9. Discussions are a nightmare- It’s like a giant game of telephone and absolute randomness occurs by the third reblog.

10. Everything about tumblr is designed for fast immediate consumption. Consume, enjoy, forget, move on. Revisiting or archiving or creating a sense of place for a subfandom community is really, really difficult unless that place becomes a blog that gets lots and lots and lots of submissions. Any blog that only posts once or twice a day (ha, or less) gets lost firehose of the endless streaming dash.

meeedee:

I love tumblr’s ease of including video and images. I’ve gotten the hang of reblogging. But yeah, I agree with most of this.


Tags:fandom meta, tumblr meta, DWCrosspost
morgandawn: (Star Trek My Fandom Invented Slash)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Q4VHiA at November 03, 2015 at 10:38PM
 

wyntereyez:

…..Then I went to “The Evolution of Fanfic,” which interested me since I caught the end of the era where fan fic was something found in fanzines and sharing them was a very private, under the table thing.  I remember that I didn’t get into fandom until college, when I finally had internet access.  This panel felt very academic, and was interesting.  The very first slash story, for example, was a Kirk/Spock story that started as a writing exercise in which the writer didn’t identify the characters or their sexes, though the author said in her notes that’s who she was writing about.  Apparently, it’s online somewhere, and now I have to find it….  Anyway, the gist of this panel is that we all have it easy these days…

meedee:
The Star Trek story is called “A Fragment Out of Time”. You can read more about its history at Fanlore, the fan run wiki about media fandom.


Tags:fandom history, star trek history, slash history, destielcon, fanlore, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Hql6v1 at November 03, 2015 at 08:54PM 

 

deansangelicpurity:

I finally get it.  I finally understand what bugs the haters so much about DestielCon.  This is gold.

They keep making the argument “Why can’t you just do that in your pjs over Tumblr?  Why can’t you just go out to eat and hang out?  Or Skype?  You’re paying to see your friends that’s so obsessive and weird.”

They honestly have no earthly idea how many Destiel shippers there actually are.  They’re either completely ignorant of it or are choosing to not look into it.  Because those suggestions are all fine and dandy when there’s like, fifteen of you or something.  Hell even like twenty.

But there’s WAY more than that.  There was over a hundred people that came to the con last year, THE FIRST ONE EVER, which is entirely UNHEARD OF when it comes to fan made cons to have those kind of numbers on its first run-through.  I don’t know the count from this year’s con, but it’s likely more than last year.

You can’t fucking Skype with over a hundred people at a time.  You can’t just go out to eat with a hundred people, especially since they’re scattered everywhere across the country.  Those suggestions are absolutely ludicrous to consider when you have THAT MANY people that want to convene and have fun together.

I can’t stop laughing I mean, this is hilarious.  They’ve been telling themselves Destiel fans are so small and only 1% etc etc for so long that they literally cannot wrap their head around the fact that our numbers REQUIRE a convention environment if we want to all convene and celebrate with each other at the same time.  Like come on.  That’s fucking brilliantly ignorant.

caswouldratherbehere:

140 this year. And yes, that’s a very, very tiny fraction of the destiel fandom. I’d guess the bulk of the destiel fandom still doesn’t know about the con, and of those that do, even more can’t make it to due to schedule conflicts, traveling expenses, or just being way too far away to be able to consider it. There a plethora of reasons someone might not be able to make it. Then there are some aren’t in to the idea, and that’s fine too.

140 sounds small but in context to other fan conventions, that it only just finished its second year, and other outside factors, that’s huge.

And yeah, I’d like to see a Skype call with 140 people. Epic.

 
meedee:
As someone who started participating in fandom both online and going to in person events, it seems odd to favor only one way of interacting with fellow fans. I love both types.


Tags:fan run conventions, conventions, destielcon, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Star Trek My Fandom Invented Slash)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1NckOK9 at November 03, 2015 at 04:14PM


 

spirkian:

The cake.

Star Trek K/S fans held their annual Kiscon convention in Seattle this weekend. This is the celebratory cake, festooned with artwork from Courts of Honor. Courts of Honor was written by Syn Ferguson who was the guest of Honor.


Tags:Star Trek convention, fandom history, fanzines, Kirk/Spock, space husbands, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

post-security: public
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Mxname at November 02, 2015 at 08:00PM


 

otwelections-unofficial:

It’s time for the OTW elections!

Elections for the OTW — the nonprofit behind AO3, Fanlore, Transformative Works and Cultures and other projects — start on November 6, and it’s time to make your choice. If you’ve made a donation between October 6, 2014 and October 6, 2015 and chose to become a member, you have the right to vote and choose two directors joining the OTW Board for the next three years. 

 Here are the candidates:

Votes are tallied according to the IRV system (what does this mean?). When it’s time to vote, please rank in order of preference the candidates you want to see win. If you don’t want to support a candidate, don’t rank them at all. There are two seats open for election this year. 

If you want to read up and share your thoughts on the issues surrounding these elections, check out the #otw elections tag. 

Come November 6, if you have the right to vote in the OTW elections, please read up on the issues at stake, choose your candidates, and vote.


Tags:otw, otw elections, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

uptownstump:

TH*NKS P*TE

From Fanlore, the fan-run wiki about media fandom:

Lost in a crowd is a panfandom tumblr meme that started in August 2015. It is a text-based meme in four parts: character A can’t find character B in a crowd and says “This calls for drastic measures,” character A shouts something that character B is guaranteed to find offensive, character B leaps out of the crowd and shouts something angry in reply, character A says either “There they are” or “Found them”. Often the thing guaranteed to anger character B is an insult to character A.    memedocumentation identified the origin of the meme as aSteve/Bucky post on August 10 by jibblyuniverse.[1] As of October 2015, the post has over 46,000 notes.”

This page brought to you by Fanlore’s Random Page Generator


Tags:fanlore, fandom history, lost in a crowd, fanlore random page post, tumblr meme, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at tumblr at October 01, 2015 at 11:11AM

meeedeee:

ormondhsacker:

Since some people apparently misunderstood what I was trying to discuss - well it started as a rant, but turned into a discussion somewhere along the way - in this post, I shall try to make my point clearer and tag everyone who participated. Whether they want to continue the discussion then I leave up to them.

So in no particular order of appearance: meeedeeeageorwizardry,doomhamsterbert-and-ernie-are-gaycentrumlumina,impostoradultflourish

My rant was born of a frustration that every time anyone tries to discuss why F/F fics and female centred fic in general are ignored to the extent that they are, a common argument to shut it down is ‘well, fandom is dominated by straight women so what do you expect?’.

But there’s no evidence to support this claim and a good deal of circumstantial evidence that indicates the opposite might be true. Hence my rant about a reference for the straightness claim.

My interest is not and never was about women who read fanfic as a source of porn, there are problems in this kind of borderline fetishisation but it is not for this post nor did I intend the other post to go in the direction of discussing porn preferences. (Kindly don’t go there with this post. I know it’ll be difficult but please make another post and tag me in it. I’m sick of this discussion getting derailed into smut land). My focus was on all the rest of the fics, the relationship ones, the romantics, the angsty, the plot based action fics and so on, they too get ignored in a way they never would if it was an M/M or even just M/F fic, even when they’re not about people’s OTP.

But for some reason fandom is so obsessed with two white boys bonking that they’re incapable of seeing beyond the porn in fanfic, which raises the question why a space that is supposedly welcome to LGBTQIA people perpetuates the homophobic hypersexualisation of same gender pairing that the rest of society is so eager to do.

My interest in the sexuality of fandom is actually marginal. It could be an interesting thing to examine, but it is in no way high on my list. My one and only interest in it is insofar at this enforced heteronormativity of fandom is used as an argument to shut down discussion. And being of a particularly non-straight sexuality does not exempt a person from perpetuating this mindset - most whom I have seen use it have been identifying as bi or pan, but this is anecdotal evidence - 

The reasons for reading and writing slash (and no, I don’t fucking mean smut I mean fics with same gender pairings that’s what the term slash means, it does in no way exclusively cover smut fics no matter how much homophobes would claim that jeeze) are multiple and varied and no single study could ever remotely cover everything and anyone who claims otherwise is either ignorant of how academic research works or lying. But saying that there should be no protest, no questioning, no examination of why F/F fics are ignored, of why the supposed heteronormativity of fandom is used as an argument to shut a mere attempt at debate down, is further alienating and shoving under the bus those (female) fans who are uncomfortable with these mechanisms, because in doing so they’re being told, once again, that they’re unwelcome in fandom.

As usual, the topic threads are so complex that it is hard to track what is being said. I often feel like we are talking past one another (which, when you read the diverging threads you will understand that we often aretalking past one another)

Several questions have been posted and they don’t always intersect
1. Where did the myth start that fandom was comprised of straight women? (history question and answer)
2. Why does the myth still persist? Why are people relying on outdated research?  (history and current research question)
3. Is there new research going on that will give us better data about the makeup of fans (current research question)
4. Are there methodological limits on what kinds of data  we can obtain? (current research question)
5. Does the discussion of why women write slash run the risk of over emphasizing some aspects of our culture (gender politics) and de-emphasizing  other aspects (female sexuality) (sociological /gender politics question)
6  Even assuming fandom is mainly queer/bi why does femmeslash constantly get sidelined in favor of male/male slash ?(sociological /gender politics question)
7. Does the continued  discussion of fandom’s gender makeup or motivations for writing  slash marginalize those who want to discuss why femmeslash is being ignored? (sociological)

I am certain there are some that I missed or that I oversimplified or linked to the wrong posts. But it may help further the discussion if we indicate what aspect that we’re focusing on.
 

_____________________________________________________________
To answer #6 (so sorry about the numbering):
 Even if fandom was predominantly heterosexual, I don’t see how fans can rationally use this fact to shut down discussions about why there is a lack of femmeslash* 

Just because one is heterosexual does not mean one would not be interested in femmeslash.  Just as not all heterosexual women are interested in m/m slash.   So to use the presence of heterosexuality to shut down discussions of femmeslash makes about as much sense (to me) as using Chinese grammar rules to shut down discussions  of English grammar rules.   

Keep in mind that I come from a  slash (M/M) perspective and from a time where enjoyment of male/male slash placed you - whether you were heterosexual or gay - outside any norm. We might as well have been speaking Martian back then. (”So…you’re straight but you like to read about men bonking? Wait, you’re gay and you like to read about men boking? No, wait, you’re bi and you like to read about men bonking? Stop it!  Just. Stop it!! What’s wrong with the lot of you!!!?”)

Back in 2013, when the AO3 census survey results were posted, there were similar discussions. And I found this one quote that pretty much summed it up for me:

“There are so many things that set us on our course of sexuality, and only a few of them are the things people mean when they talk in labels.” 

*This is not to say fans are not shutting down discussions. 
_____________________________________________________________

More thoughts on #1:

other commentators have pointed out that  historical data about the sexual preferences of slash readers has been incomplete. Not only were there no surveys, even if there had been, many of the participants who might have identified as gay or bi would not have answered truthfully. This has everything to do with the lack of acceptance and self awareness of being bi or gay in the US in the 1960s-1990s.  

Anecdotally, some of the “formerly heterosexual fan pairs” that I met in slash fandom in the 1990s have now gone on to marry or become partners.  So the outward expression of their sexual preferences  has changed over time as our society has grown more accepting of the expression. This would skew any survey and statistical results - if there had been any. So the "slash readers are primarily  heterosexual" statement is neither 100% correct nor 100% false - from a historical point of view.  We can try to extrapolate backwards from today's data*, but we cannot know for sure.

*those who gathered the more recent data would also be the first to point out how limited their surveys were - both in terms of scope and methodology.


Tags:slash history, fandom history, fandom meta, femmeslash, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)

morgandawn: (Default)
Vidder Radio is a series of interviews by the owner of vidders.net, an alternative streaming website for fanvids

link to Interview
morgandawn: Fandom is my Fandom (Fandom is my Fandom)
"I don’t like Chicken Little attitudes: OTW has been plagued by naysayers who think it’s on the point of collapse since the Livejournal post where the concept of AO3 was first proposed. OTW is not going to suddenly collapse just because the “wrong” person wins an election. But the reality is that AO3 got fucking ginormous much, much faster than anticipated, and the management and planning just didn’t keep up. There have been problems with project management, communication, and delegation for years at this point. Financially… well, OTW is Magic Mike, and fandom’s been making it rain, but a lot of that money remained stuffed in OTW’s thong, doing nothing useful. Looks like there’s no oversight of it at the moment either."
— olderthannetfic on “Why You Should Vote In The 2015 OTW Elections” - Part 1

She then goes on to give specific suggestions and recommendations.  

Deadline to become a voting member is Oct 6. 

Elections are between Nov 6-9, 2015.

An unofficial OTW Election News Blog

morgandawn: (Default)

otwelections-unofficial:

Hi, everyone! The official OTW Elections timeline has now been posted, and it has been decided that everyone who became an OTW member (made a US$10 donation and opted for membership) between October 6, 2014 and October 6, 2015—inclusive—is eligible to vote in the November elections. So if you want to vote this year, please make sure that includes you.

Some essential info:

The elections will take place on November 6–9, 2015. If you’re a member, please read up on the candidates and vote! (And until then, please signal boost!)

morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1W1MpEr at September 15, 2015 at 09:39PM

(via She Hates Me : Sisabet : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive)
The Fanlore page

Tags:vidding, fanvid, fan vid, vidder:sisabet, moonlighting, vid:she hates me, DWCrosspos

morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

Always make certain you have enough pet crates and vehicles large enough to evacuate your animals in case of emergency.

“When they departed in a rush, they had been unable to fit their large St. Bernard, Stinky, in the car. “He followed us for a few miles, then we had to speed away and we lost him,” Candlario recalls.

He had tweeted a social media plea for neighbors to watch out for the dog but was overjoyed to find upon his return that Stinky was waiting at the ranch house.

“There he was,” says Candlario. “I can only imagine what he had to go through to find his way back during that fire.”

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2015/0914/Amid-destruction-of-California-s-Valley-fire-moments-of-deep-gratitude

 
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
heidi8:Fair use is … wholly authorized by the law. That’s what the 9th Circuit said today, in a ruling that will become a terrific tool to support sharing of transformative works (like fanfic, fanart, cosplay, fanfilms, filks, etc.). Back in 2001 and 2003, when I first started writing and speaking about fair use in connection with what we’re now calling “fan law”,  we did a lot of argiing by analogy. Caselaw hadn’t really caught up with how people were actually using the internet and definitely hadn’t caught up with the idea that fans of a show or book or film or band or piece of art or work of creativity would create a “follow-on work” and share it at no cost to anyone, on the internet. But lawyers argue by analogy - we go before a court and say “this is similar to that, and thus the laws for that should also apply to this”. That’s how it works (at least in the US) so it was reasonable  to say because of court rulings in The Wind Done Gone and the 2 Live Crew case re Pretty Woman, or a 1996 case in the 11th Circuit that said “fair use is not an infringement, that (noncommercially distributed) fanworks - as transformative works - were fair use and thus were not infringements of someone’s copyright. By and large, over the last fifteen years (and actually, through  the 90s too) the courts have agreed with this concept every time something that parallels an aspect of fanworks comes before an appellate court. Click the Fair Use tag here for examples. However, today the 9th Circuit issued its ruling in Lenz v. Universal, a case that dates back EIGHT YEARS to a pre-Google time at YouTube, when the tv networks were all freaking out about this new way that people could get content via the internet, and the music companies were continuing their perpetual angst about the idea that certain uses of songs could be, in any way noninfringing. While Lenz doesn’t really redefine large swaths of law, it makes a few points explicit and clear: Fair use is not just excused by the law, it is wholly authorized by the law.A copyright holder must consider the existence of fair use before sending a takedown notification.The DMCA requires consideration of fair use prior to sending a takedown notification…If a copyright holder ignores or neglects our unequivocal holding that it must consider fair use before sending a takedown notification, it is liable for damages.A copyright holder who pays lip service to the consideration of fair use by claiming it formed a good faith belief when there is evidence to the contrary is still subject to §512(f) liability.The court also quoted a brief from transformativeworks (OTW/AO3) where we set forth when computer programs might be of use in finding infringements where  “(1) the video track matches the video track of a copyrighted work submitted by a content owner; (2) the audio track matches the audio track of that same copyrighted work;and (3) nearly the entirety…is comprised of a single copyrighted work.” As you can see, that process wouldn’t be applicable for fanworks. The ruling doesn’t mean an end to automatic takedown notices; where a file of concern matches exactly to a single copyrighted work *and* nearly the entirety of the file of concern is comprised of that single copyrighted work, bots and automated notices would still be viable. But a video manifesting mashup culture or a story that’s a follow-on work or a meme that includes a copyrighted photo and text that comments on or criticizes something, or educational infographs should not be DMCA-ed by autobots, and any analysis by the copyright-holder of the fanfic, fanart, etc. they’re looking at must actually look to current law regarding whether something is a transformative work/fair use/otherwise noninfringing. Does this mean that creative fans will suddenly start experiencing fewer DMCA takedowns? Possibly, but also maybe not. But it does mean that if a creative fan gets a DMCA takedown/notification about fanworks (especially when there’s no commercial sale) the fan can and should push back on whether the sender has actually considered fair use; if it’s obvious that they haven’t, the creative fan may be able to seek damages. Perhaps that risk of damages will be a disincentive to copyright-holders, so they focus their attention, and DMCA notices, on works that are actual counterfeits - copies of entire movies, books or tv serieses, or high resolution copies of art. Copyright holders cannot shirk their duty to consider—in good faith and prior to sending a takedown notification—whether allegedly infringing material constitutes fair use, a use which the DMCA plainly contemplates as authorized by the law. And that’s a good thing. 

heidi8:Fair use is … wholly authorized by the law. That’s what the 9th Circuit said today, in a ruling that will become a terrific tool to support sharing of transformative works (like fanfic, fanart, cosplay, fanfilms, filks, etc.). Back in 2001 and 2003, when I first started writing and speaking about fair use in connection with what we’re now calling “fan law”,  we did a lot of argiing by analogy. Caselaw hadn’t really caught up with how people were actually using the internet and definitely hadn’t caught up with the idea that fans of a show or book or film or band or piece of art or work of creativity would create a “follow-on work” and share it at no cost to anyone, on the internet. But lawyers argue by analogy - we go before a court and say “this is similar to that, and thus the laws for that should also apply to this”. That’s how it works (at least in the US) so it was reasonable  to say because of court rulings in The Wind Done Gone and the 2 Live Crew case re Pretty Woman, or a 1996 case in the 11th Circuit that said “fair use is not an infringement, that (noncommercially distributed) fanworks - as transformative works - were fair use and thus were not infringements of someone’s copyright. By and large, over the last fifteen years (and actually, through  the 90s too) the courts have agreed with this concept every time something that parallels an aspect of fanworks comes before an appellate court. Click the Fair Use tag here for examples. However, today the 9th Circuit issued its ruling in Lenz v. Universal, a case that dates back EIGHT YEARS to a pre-Google time at YouTube, when the tv networks were all freaking out about this new way that people could get content via the internet, and the music companies were continuing their perpetual angst about the idea that certain uses of songs could be, in any way noninfringing. While Lenz doesn’t really redefine large swaths of law, it makes a few points explicit and clear: Fair use is not just excused by the law, it is wholly authorized by the law.A copyright holder must consider the existence of fair use before sending a takedown notification.The DMCA requires consideration of fair use prior to sending a takedown notification…If a copyright holder ignores or neglects our unequivocal holding that it must consider fair use before sending a takedown notification, it is liable for damages.A copyright holder who pays lip service to the consideration of fair use by claiming it formed a good faith belief when there is evidence to the contrary is still subject to §512(f) liability.The court also quoted a brief from transformativeworks (OTW/AO3) where we set forth when computer programs might be of use in finding infringements where  “(1) the video track matches the video track of a copyrighted work submitted by a content owner; (2) the audio track matches the audio track of that same copyrighted work;and (3) nearly the entirety…is comprised of a single copyrighted work.” As you can see, that process wouldn’t be applicable for fanworks. The ruling doesn’t mean an end to automatic takedown notices; where a file of concern matches exactly to a single copyrighted work *and* nearly the entirety of the file of concern is comprised of that single copyrighted work, bots and automated notices would still be viable. But a video manifesting mashup culture or a story that’s a follow-on work or a meme that includes a copyrighted photo and text that comments on or criticizes something, or educational infographs should not be DMCA-ed by autobots, and any analysis by the copyright-holder of the fanfic, fanart, etc. they’re looking at must actually look to current law regarding whether something is a transformative work/fair use/otherwise noninfringing. Does this mean that creative fans will suddenly start experiencing fewer DMCA takedowns? Possibly, but also maybe not. But it does mean that if a creative fan gets a DMCA takedown/notification about fanworks (especially when there’s no commercial sale) the fan can and should push back on whether the sender has actually considered fair use; if it’s obvious that they haven’t, the creative fan may be able to seek damages. Perhaps that risk of damages will be a disincentive to copyright-holders, so they focus their attention, and DMCA notices, on works that are actual counterfeits - copies of entire movies, books or tv serieses, or high resolution copies of art. Copyright holders cannot shirk their duty to consider—in good faith and prior to sending a takedown notification—whether allegedly infringing material constitutes fair use, a use which the DMCA plainly contemplates as authorized by the law. And that’s a good thing. 


heidi8:Fair use is … wholly authorized by the law. That’s what the 9th Circuit said today, in a ruling that will become a terrific tool to support sharing of transformative works (like fanfic, fanart, cosplay, fanfilms, filks, etc.). Back in 2001 and 2003, when I first started writing and speaking about fair use in connection with what we’re now calling “fan law”,  we did a lot of argiing by analogy. Caselaw hadn’t really caught up with how people were actually using the internet and definitely hadn’t caught up with the idea that fans of a show or book or film or band or piece of art or work of creativity would create a “follow-on work” and share it at no cost to anyone, on the internet. But lawyers argue by analogy - we go before a court and say “this is similar to that, and thus the laws for that should also apply to this”. That’s how it works (at least in the US) so it was reasonable  to say because of court rulings in The Wind Done Gone and the 2 Live Crew case re Pretty Woman, or a 1996 case in the 11th Circuit that said “fair use is not an infringement, that (noncommercially distributed) fanworks - as transformative works - were fair use and thus were not infringements of someone’s copyright. By and large, over the last fifteen years (and actually, through  the 90s too) the courts have agreed with this concept every time something that parallels an aspect of fanworks comes before an appellate court. Click the Fair Use tag here for examples. However, today the 9th Circuit issued its ruling in Lenz v. Universal, a case that dates back EIGHT YEARS to a pre-Google time at YouTube, when the tv networks were all freaking out about this new way that people could get content via the internet, and the music companies were continuing their perpetual angst about the idea that certain uses of songs could be, in any way noninfringing. While Lenz doesn’t really redefine large swaths of law, it makes a few points explicit and clear: Fair use is not just excused by the law, it is wholly authorized by the law.A copyright holder must consider the existence of fair use before sending a takedown notification.The DMCA requires consideration of fair use prior to sending a takedown notification…If a copyright holder ignores or neglects our unequivocal holding that it must consider fair use before sending a takedown notification, it is liable for damages.A copyright holder who pays lip service to the consideration of fair use by claiming it formed a good faith belief when there is evidence to the contrary is still subject to §512(f) liability.The court also quoted a brief from transformativeworks (OTW/AO3) where we set forth when computer programs might be of use in finding infringements where  “(1) the video track matches the video track of a copyrighted work submitted by a content owner; (2) the audio track matches the audio track of that same copyrighted work;and (3) nearly the entirety…is comprised of a single copyrighted work.” As you can see, that process wouldn’t be applicable for fanworks. The ruling doesn’t mean an end to automatic takedown notices; where a file of concern matches exactly to a single copyrighted work *and* nearly the entirety of the file of concern is comprised of that single copyrighted work, bots and automated notices would still be viable. But a video manifesting mashup culture or a story that’s a follow-on work or a meme that includes a copyrighted photo and text that comments on or criticizes something, or educational infographs should not be DMCA-ed by autobots, and any analysis by the copyright-holder of the fanfic, fanart, etc. they’re looking at must actually look to current law regarding whether something is a transformative work/fair use/otherwise noninfringing. Does this mean that creative fans will suddenly start experiencing fewer DMCA takedowns? Possibly, but also maybe not. But it does mean that if a creative fan gets a DMCA takedown/notification about fanworks (especially when there’s no commercial sale) the fan can and should push back on whether the sender has actually considered fair use; if it’s obvious that they haven’t, the creative fan may be able to seek damages. Perhaps that risk of damages will be a disincentive to copyright-holders, so they focus their attention, and DMCA notices, on works that are actual counterfeits - copies of entire movies, books or tv serieses, or high resolution copies of art. Copyright holders cannot shirk their duty to consider—in good faith and prior to sending a takedown notification—whether allegedly infringing material constitutes fair use, a use which the DMCA plainly contemplates as authorized by the law. And that’s a good thing. 


heidi8:Fair use is … wholly authorized by the law. That’s what the 9th Circuit said today, in a ruling that will become a terrific tool to support sharing of transformative works (like fanfic, fanart, cosplay, fanfilms, filks, etc.). Back in 2001 and 2003, when I first started writing and speaking about fair use in connection with what we’re now calling “fan law”,  we did a lot of argiing by analogy. Caselaw hadn’t really caught up with how people were actually using the internet and definitely hadn’t caught up with the idea that fans of a show or book or film or band or piece of art or work of creativity would create a “follow-on work” and share it at no cost to anyone, on the internet. But lawyers argue by analogy - we go before a court and say “this is similar to that, and thus the laws for that should also apply to this”. That’s how it works (at least in the US) so it was reasonable  to say because of court rulings in The Wind Done Gone and the 2 Live Crew case re Pretty Woman, or a 1996 case in the 11th Circuit that said “fair use is not an infringement, that (noncommercially distributed) fanworks - as transformative works - were fair use and thus were not infringements of someone’s copyright. By and large, over the last fifteen years (and actually, through  the 90s too) the courts have agreed with this concept every time something that parallels an aspect of fanworks comes before an appellate court. Click the Fair Use tag here for examples. However, today the 9th Circuit issued its ruling in Lenz v. Universal, a case that dates back EIGHT YEARS to a pre-Google time at YouTube, when the tv networks were all freaking out about this new way that people could get content via the internet, and the music companies were continuing their perpetual angst about the idea that certain uses of songs could be, in any way noninfringing. While Lenz doesn’t really redefine large swaths of law, it makes a few points explicit and clear: Fair use is not just excused by the law, it is wholly authorized by the law.A copyright holder must consider the existence of fair use before sending a takedown notification.The DMCA requires consideration of fair use prior to sending a takedown notification…If a copyright holder ignores or neglects our unequivocal holding that it must consider fair use before sending a takedown notification, it is liable for damages.A copyright holder who pays lip service to the consideration of fair use by claiming it formed a good faith belief when there is evidence to the contrary is still subject to §512(f) liability.The court also quoted a brief from transformativeworks (OTW/AO3) where we set forth when computer programs might be of use in finding infringements where  “(1) the video track matches the video track of a copyrighted work submitted by a content owner; (2) the audio track matches the audio track of that same copyrighted work;and (3) nearly the entirety…is comprised of a single copyrighted work.” As you can see, that process wouldn’t be applicable for fanworks. The ruling doesn’t mean an end to automatic takedown notices; where a file of concern matches exactly to a single copyrighted work *and* nearly the entirety of the file of concern is comprised of that single copyrighted work, bots and automated notices would still be viable. But a video manifesting mashup culture or a story that’s a follow-on work or a meme that includes a copyrighted photo and text that comments on or criticizes something, or educational infographs should not be DMCA-ed by autobots, and any analysis by the copyright-holder of the fanfic, fanart, etc. they’re looking at must actually look to current law regarding whether something is a transformative work/fair use/otherwise noninfringing. Does this mean that creative fans will suddenly start experiencing fewer DMCA takedowns? Possibly, but also maybe not. But it does mean that if a creative fan gets a DMCA takedown/notification about fanworks (especially when there’s no commercial sale) the fan can and should push back on whether the sender has actually considered fair use; if it’s obvious that they haven’t, the creative fan may be able to seek damages. Perhaps that risk of damages will be a disincentive to copyright-holders, so they focus their attention, and DMCA notices, on works that are actual counterfeits - copies of entire movies, books or tv serieses, or high resolution copies of art. Copyright holders cannot shirk their duty to consider—in good faith and prior to sending a takedown notification—whether allegedly infringing material constitutes fair use, a use which the DMCA plainly contemplates as authorized by the law. And that’s a good thing. 

heidi8:

Fair use is … wholly authorized by the law. That’s what the 9th Circuit said today, in a ruling that will become a terrific tool to support sharing of transformative works (like fanfic, fanart, cosplay, fanfilms, filks, etc.). 

Back in 2001 and 2003, when I first started writing and speaking about fair use in connection with what we’re now calling “fan law”,  we did a lot of argiing by analogy. Caselaw hadn’t really caught up with how people were actually using the internet and definitely hadn’t caught up with the idea that fans of a show or book or film or band or piece of art or work of creativity would create a “follow-on work” and share it at no cost to anyone, on the internet. 

But lawyers argue by analogy - we go before a court and say “this is similar to that, and thus the laws for that should also apply to this”. That’s how it works (at least in the US) so it was reasonable  to say because of court rulings in The Wind Done Gone and the 2 Live Crew case re Pretty Woman, or a 1996 case in the 11th Circuit that said “ fair use is not an infringement, that (noncommercially distributed) fanworks - as transformative works - were fair use and thus were not infringements of someone’s copyright. 

By and large, over the last fifteen years (and actually, through  the 90s too) the courts have agreed with this concept every time something that parallels an aspect of fanworks comes before an appellate court. Click the Fair Use tag here for examples. 

However, today the 9th Circuit issued its ruling in Lenz v. Universal, a case that dates back EIGHT YEARS to a pre-Google time at YouTube, when the tv networks were all freaking out about this new way that people could get content via the internet, and the music companies were continuing their perpetual angst about the idea that certain uses of songs could be, in any way noninfringing. 

While Lenz doesn’t really redefine large swaths of law, it makes a few points explicit and clear: 

  • Fair use is not just excused by the law, it is wholly authorized by the law.
  • A copyright holder must consider the existence of fair use before sending a takedown notification.
  • The DMCA requires consideration of fair use prior to sending a takedown notification…
  • If a copyright holder ignores or neglects our unequivocal holding that it must consider fair use before sending a takedown notification, it is liable for damages.
  • A copyright holder who pays lip service to the consideration of fair use by claiming it formed a good faith belief when there is evidence to the contrary is still subject to §512(f) liability.

The court also quoted a brief from transformativeworks (OTW/AO3) where we set forth when computer programs might be of use in finding infringements where  “(1) the video track matches the video track of a copyrighted work submitted by a content owner; (2) the audio track matches the audio track of that same copyrighted work;and (3) nearly the entirety…is comprised of a single copyrighted work.” As you can see, that process wouldn’t be applicable for fanworks. 

The ruling doesn’t mean an end to automatic takedown notices; where a file of concern matches exactly to a single copyrighted work *and* nearly the entirety of the file of concern is comprised of that single copyrighted work, bots and automated notices would still be viable. 

But a video manifesting mashup culture or a story that’s a follow-on work or a meme that includes a copyrighted photo and text that comments on or criticizes something, or educational infographs should not be DMCA-ed by autobots, and any analysis by the copyright-holder of the fanfic, fanart, etc. they’re looking at must actually look to current law regarding whether something is a transformative work/fair use/otherwise noninfringing. 

Does this mean that creative fans will suddenly start experiencing fewer DMCA takedowns? Possibly, but also maybe not. But it does mean that if a creative fan gets a DMCA takedown/notification about fanworks (especially when there’s no commercial sale) the fan can and should push back on whether the sender has actually considered fair use; if it’s obvious that they haven’t, the creative fan may be able to seek damages. 

Perhaps that risk of damages will be a disincentive to copyright-holders, so they focus their attention, and DMCA notices, on works that are actual counterfeits - copies of entire movies, books or tv serieses, or high resolution copies of art. 

Copyright holders cannot shirk their duty to consider—in good faith and prior to sending a takedown notification—whether allegedly infringing material constitutes fair use, a use which the DMCA plainly contemplates as authorized by the law.

And that’s a good thing. 

morgandawn: (Zen fen lanning Green)
plaidadder posted:

I don’t know how the whole debate about the X-Files’ original demographic got started, so it would be foolish for me to enter into it. But I have been interested to see the information going around about tumblr’s actual demographic breakdown, and to discover that the percentage of people on tumblr under the age of 18 is comparatively small.

I’m 46. I can tell you why I’m on tumblr, and why it makes sense to me that a lot of people in my age range or slightly younger are on it. And yet I too had the impression, when I first signed on, that tumblr was basically a teenagers’ site, and quite frankly felt very weird about that at first. I’m going to talk about what ‘social media’ (we were not calling it that then) was like back in the 1990s when we first started using it, and why I think tumblr replicates some aspects of that experience, and how and why I think tumblr creates the impression that its main demographic is 13-18 year olds. This is all subjective opinion and you don’t have to believe any of it. But you know, old people, we are always trying to share our wisdom. We can’t help it. I know it’s annoying.

Keep reading

****************************************************

 

For everyone who says that there is no good textual meta on tumblr, I point to the above essay which touches on so many issues, including the perception of age in fandom and tumblr demographics  I quote some excerpts below, but the essay deserves its own entire read:

tumblr is attractive to me partly because it replicates some of those old-fashioned pre-Facebook modes of interaction. Most people on tumblr use pseudonymous handles. Most profile pictures are of something other than the user herself, and usually come from whatever thing the user is a fan of. The same user can set up multiple blogs under multiple pseudonyms. And you can post as much text as you want. It’s true that unless you lead with an image, a lot of people won’t read your text posts because they want to be able to know what fandom they’re about before they invest in reading the actual words, and that’s fair. It also incorporates some features that we all wished we’d had back in the day, including a means of keeping track of who’s reading your stuff. ….

It is also, of course, much newer in its overwhelming preference for images (moving and static) and in the reblogging function (this was not a thing back in the day; the only way to circulate content was to attach it or incorporate it into an email). And when you first sign up it is really difficult to figure out how to have a conversation on it. The new udpate, of course, makes that even more difficult.Anyway. So it makes perfect sense to me that there are a lot of people from my generation of internet users on tumblr…..

…..Most of us who are old on tumblr aren’t here because tumblr recruited us. We’re here because this is where fandom went, and so we follow the fandom. ….. I think it’s great that tumblr is intergenerational. Fandom always has been. And there will probably always be some friction between generations; but we’ll all get through it. We all have a lot to learn from each other.“
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)

Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1L8MRgV at September 12, 2015 at 12:29PM

Often when I read fandom meta (or any meta) I am struck by how the lack of specifics hamper not only discussion but understanding. 

TL;DR: People are silly.

Fan 1: I refuse to associate with moose. Moose are scary. Moose should not be allowed to roam where they can scare me.

Moose-world: Hey wait, I resemble that remark. I am not scary and I am a free range moose and have been one since the beginning of time.

Fan 2: You are invalidating her feelings and just proving how scary and evil all moose really are.

Moose-world: No, you are being the scary one, trying to whip up hate and anger and exile for all the kind and generous moose that have existed (and will continue to exist). Shame on you, you…you….Moose hater.

Fan 3: I for one welcome people who understand that moose can be scary and that we all need to work together to prevent them from trampling the tender shoots of grass.

Moose-world:  Tender shoots of grass? WTF did that come from?  Are you actually arguing that we have to start floating six inches off the ground?  You realize how crazy that sounds?

Fan 1: A moose bit my sister once.

Me:  Ouch. Moose bites can be pretty nasty.   Perhaps you can put up a sign so that the moose will steer clear. 

Fan 4: You don’t get to tell her what to do. A moose bit her sister once. And it hurt.  Really hurt. It’s not her fault that a moose bit her sister once.

Me: ??

Management:  We apologize for the fault in the subtleties. Those responsible have been sacked.


Tags:fandom meta, it's a scary moose world, be careful out there, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
 
 
 
morgandawn: (Star Trek My Fandom Invented Slash)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1ihyKuK at September 10, 2015 at 04:50PM


back cover T'hy'la #12 by Marilyn Cole


front cover T'hy'la #12 by Marilyn Cole

Interested in reading K/S fanzines?
The US K/S Press Fanzine Library has fanzines to loan.

The K/S Press is a free monthly newsletter that any K/S fan can subscribe to by contacting
catalenamara

The Press offers two lending libraries - one in the US and
one in the UK.

The US librarian has run the KS Press Fanzine Library for many years. She knows the zines very well and can assist new readers, guiding them to zines that will be just what they’re looking for. To borrow from the library, you need to become a K/S Press member. There is a small yearly fee charged to use the library.
Here is a listing of the US Libraries holdings.

Why The Library?
Although the library does not lend out zines that are still in print, there is a whole legacy of zines available. Zines with art and poetry. Zines with stories that will never be published on the internet or archives such as AO3 or The K/S Archive. Classics such as
Courts of Honor that may be difficult to read off of a computer screen.

Borrowing
The US library will mail up to three zines for a period of five weeks; a week to read each zine plus a week at each end for mailing. They usually mail zines at the Media Mail rate, which is the cheapest way, but of course will mail at any rate the borrower wishes. When the zines are returned the postage costs to get the zines to the reader are returned as well.

The Chris Soto Memorial Library
The US KS Press librarian also administers The
Chris Soto Memorial Library which consists of tapes and professional books about Star Trek including all the episodes and the animated series. All titles in the zine library including hard-to-find gen zines galore, are printed each month in the KSP.

Questions? Contact Carolyn Spencer @
Carspence @ aol.com (please contact catalenamara first as you need to be a member of KS Press in order to borrow from the library)

*The covers for
T'hy'la #12 merge to form a panoramic view of Spock spinning a web around Kirk. Artwork by Marilyn Cole

Tags:fanzines, star trek fanzines, fandom history, fanzine history, KS press, Kirk/Spock, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
 
 
 
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1NkiYKD at September 10, 2015 at 10:13AM

“When someone is making money from fan labor, there is always an opportunity for censorship. When fans have to depend on someone else, that someone else might take something down that they don’t like, and we don’t have to think too hard about why they might not like it—maybe they won’t like it for copyright reasons, maybe they won’t like it for trademark reasons, maybe they won’t like it for content reasons, maybe they won’t like it for personality reasons. But there’s a sort of personal autonomy element to fandom that I think is a really important thing to preserve. Maybe not the only important thing to preserve, but a thing that matters, and I think that’s part of what mattered to the [Organization for Transformative Works].”

-Betsy Rosenblatt in the newest episode of fansplaining, talking about some of the driving ideas behind the founding of transformativeworks (via fansplaining)

AO3 = Archive OOur Own = A Room Of One’s Own   = “noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy. “


Tags:fandom meta, fandom history, copyright abuse, fair use, ao3, otw, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1ieDSzF at September 09, 2015 at 05:35PM

fansplaining:

These notes go along with this episode (transcript on its way)!


Tags:Fansplaining, podcast, otw, fanlore, fandom meta, legal advocacy, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1iej7nK at September 09, 2015 at 01:48PM

fandomfanworks:

mild-lunacy:

I was thinking about the post where I mentioned that people tend to relate very differently to fanfiction than rational argument in metas (which they do, of course), and then I realized that… wow, I really argue with fics all the time, in my head. It’s not that I accept them more, really. It’s really a major mark of a fic I’m loving if I just accept it and go with it. Sometimes I’ll just glance at a fic and then hours (and days) later I’ll be like, ‘and another thing….’ Oh man. It’s funny because I’m never like that with metas. Like,  yes, I get serious about my disagreements sometimes, but ultimately I don’t bother about the specifics later even if I remember them. It’s not that hard to be dismissive when the actual argument is as badly constructed as it often is (after one gets over one’s huffiness). With fics, even (or perhaps especially) what I feel are bad fics (whether or not they are), I’ll resentfully argue in my head about how this is wrong and that is wrong, and no nononononono. Like that’s a kind of weird power fiction has, isn’t it? Even if I strenuously and completely reject it, it really has me, somehow. This is especially true with fanfic, of course. I just don’t care about OCs in original fiction until they make me care (I mean, I also don’t care about most OCs in BBC Sherlock, but I think it’s pretty amazing how easily many people do).

Keep reading

We talk and read a lot about the work of creating fanfics, but we often forget that reading a fanfic places the author in partnership with the reader. This is a thoughtful essay about that relationship. I particularly like this point, which is of course generalizable to any fandom and its fics:

For me, anyway, the reason I think I bother reading fanfic, especially about Sherlock Holmes, is because it’s like it’s seeing a shadow play with these action figures I’ve had since childhood. It’s someone playing with toys that feel like my own. I’m not just passively seeing someone else’s character muppets interact on my inner TV: I feel that I myself am playing with the fanfic writer and with the BBC creators collaboratively in a kind of long-distance alchemy, using these ‘toys’ that have meaning both for me and for them, but are viscerally a part of me. A writer (and a vidder, and a fanartist) can make them even more real, make them really move, make them do amazing feats– or make them betray each other or their own natures, which is unforgivable.

http://ift.tt/1iej7nM


Tags:fanfiction, fandom meta, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1idikDC at September 09, 2015 at 08:03AM

destinaf:

linzeestyle:

mustangsally78:

dashakay:

stoplookingup:

adieangel:

Note: I wrote this right around the time dashakay wrote her version, and am posting it with her blessing. I’m sorry if they overlap. I swear it’s entirely coincidental.

I don’t want to get involved in the whole drama, but I feel like maybe the OP should learn a little X-Files fandom history. And since my master’s happens to be in broadcasting and X-Files has been my fandom for 21 years, I can help you out.

Keep reading

No idea what this is in response to, but just want to affirm its truth. I was in my early 30s when XF started. I hung around on alt.tv.x-files.creative a lot through the mid- to late-90s, pre-Haven. I communicated with a lot of other fans during those years. I don’t recall ever being aware that any were teenagers. Given that online access was still limited to early adopters, many of whom gained access through their jobs, that’s no surprise. We were absolutely operating under the assumption that the fandom consisted primarily of adults – I remember discussions about rating fics to protect ourselves from liability should minors stumble across our work (not to mention the disclaimers we included because of our worries that Fox would crack down on copyright violation). 

And at the risk of stirring controversy, I have to say, older fandom was, on the whole, nicer fandom. While there was certainly some conflict (remember shippers vs. noromos?), much of it was pretty civil, and the worst of it was nothing compared to what came later. I returned to online fandom a couple of years after the relaunch of Doctor Who, and I was pretty shocked at the flame wars, sporking, anon hate, etc. And it only got worse as time went on.

So if anyone is saying us old folks should GTFO, that’s just…amusing. I’ll be over here, enjoying the company of some of the lovely XF fandom friends I’ve had for a couple of decades now, and hoping to make some news ones, young and old. 

Interesting perspective from another OG Phile…

A LOT OF IT HAD TO DO WITH MONEY. I WAS A WORKING ADULT AND HAD TO PLUNK DOWN ABOUT TWO GRAND FOR A COMPUTER IN ‘95. NOT EVERYONE HAD THE ACCESS THAT THEY DO NOW.

I was 13 when I started watching XF, and 14 when my family got our first computer: in the living room, on a 56k modem that could only be used after 10:30 because we had one phone line and my parents have a family business (they do not save people nor hunt things).  I was one of only five, perhaps six fans I knew who (after a fair amount of time) admitted to being under 21, and I was publicly “around eighteen” for a good, long while.

I’m rather finished finding kind ways to say this: fandom is not a youth space.  It is a subculture, a rich one with a very long history, pre-dating your parents, mine, and arguably even theirs (fun fact: the term “fan” was first used derisively to refer to largely female-identifying theater-goers at the turn of the 20th century, in reference to the belief they were ‘taking up seats’ by going to shoes they were not appreciating, only to ogle the actors.  Gee, sound familiar?).  Youth-oriented spaces within fandom are a fairly new construction, enabled by the rise of the internet and the ability of fans to connect with other fans, and share their enthusiasm for the texts they love, at lower and lower entry cost.  It’s a wonderful addition to fan culture but it is a ripple in the pool of fan history.  Fan space is not “youth space.”  There is a good deal of overlap, and it is very possible to make your space consist of only your peer group – regardless of your age.   But it is not a default and Tumblr’s insistence otherwise is absurd, particularly as it continues to utilize the aspects of fan-culture that are, let’s be honest, very clearly the work of older fans, from the OTW and AO3 to the changes in copyright law that allow for the sharing of high-quality gifsetst and fanvids, to a good portion of the fanfic and fanart you consume.

This isn’t to say we shouldn’t be aware of age differences online; we should be conscious of how we handle ourselves in all public spaces, particularly those of us on the adult end of the scale.  But that is exactly what fandom is: a public space.  And one that was built by, and for everyone.  There are other replies to this post that have backed this up with tumblr user-statistics and facts, and I’m not going to do that because frankly, I’m tired of chasing my tail over the absolute obvious:  fandom is not an age-related hobby.  Your younger sibling might be reading that Sherlock story you wrote, but it’s just as likely (if not more) that the last Destiel fic you read was written by your intro to American Literature instructor.  Because you might grow out of wearing that Cosplay Tardis dress in public on a day-to-day basis, but you no more grow out of having a Mulder funko pop on your office desk, or the “Star Spangled Man With A Plan” as your ringtone, than you will your love of listening to glam rock, or buying anything  with subtle rivets, or incorporating doc marten boots into reasonable day wear.  Because, say it with me now: fandom is a subculture.  You don’t “grow out of it.”  It incorporates.

Tumblr will just have to incorporate, too.

Is this sort of like ‘damn grannies, get off my lawn’? Because I’m pretty sure Granny planted the lawn upon which the children frolic.


Tags:fandom history, xfiles, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
 
 
 
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Q0j5tT at September 08, 2015 at 10:23PM

Vidder Radio with Special Guest Luminosity:

This is several years old (2009??), but I thought it would be fun to start reposting them.


Tags:vidding, vidder:luminosity, fanvid, fan vid, fandom history, vidding history, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1ETIHZ1 at September 08, 2015 at 10:42PM
“PH'NGLUI MGLW'NAFH C'THULU R'LYEH WGAH'NAGL FHTAGN!”

Tags:the elder gods, were there first, from the deep, they will come, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (BSG Roslin wikidwitch)
 in order to post to DW from tumblr I have to use DW post  by email service which works great.   problem is that all the formatting gets stripped from the DW post

I need help figuring out if this is a problem with the IFTT recipe that grabs the tumblr post and sends it to DW or if it is DW stripping the formatting.

any help appreciated.
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1EMFzON at September 08, 2015 at 07:43AM

it-is-bugs:

andromedalogic:

direcartographies:

a moment of silence for all the fanfiction lost to the ravages of time, unsalvageable even by the wayback machine, condemned to its final resting place in the deactivated archives of fansites for now-syndicated television shows

#in the name of geocities angelfire and freewebs amen

If you know what that hashtag means, you’re old as balls.  

blessings unto all the fandom archivists and their children.


Tags:fandom history, digital preservation, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1O6JWWX at September 06, 2015 at 12:17PM

Together with our partners in the Re:Create Coalition, Legal has proposed two panels for the 2016 South by Southwest conference. Find out more about them (and upvote us!) here: Copyright & Creators: 2026 (featuring Legal Chair Betsy) and Fair Use Awakens: Classrooms/Libraries/Communities (featuring Betsy and Legal Staffer Heidi). You can also find out more about Heidi’s other proposed panels and suggestions.

In August, Legal helped several fans, from several countries, with legal questions about copyright law, plagiarism, and fair use. They also successfully corresponded with the maker of an unauthorized Android app for reading on AO3. The app maker agreed to change the name of the app and make it clear in all promotions that it is unauthorized and unrelated to the OTW and that the OTW doesn’t provide support for it. Legal also took action regarding another unauthorized widget for Android that used the AO3 trademark in a confusing manner. Please be aware that the AO3 does not have an official app.

South Africa is considering adopting a fair use provision in its copyright law. Fair use supporters are trying to make sure that the law actually protects fair use, and Legal is preparing to file a supporting comment. We need your help signal-boosting our request for stories from South African fans about how they’ve benefited from making and/or consuming fanworks. Please send your stories to our Legal committee. The last time we did this, for the US, the stories were amazing.

Read more



Tags:fair use, otw, Organization for Transformative Works, south africa, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1FqBYAQ at September 05, 2015 at 11:38PM

10,000 zines and counting: a library's quest to save the history of fandom | The Verge:

The Hevelin project is digitizing science fiction fanzines from the 1930s to the 1950s (”the rise of zines and the Golden Age of science fiction”) .

I don’ t know if they are still looking for volunteers to help with the indexing, but they have a tumblr FAQ 

 “Fanzines feel almost designed to resist archival. “Creators were working with what they had, often within pretty tight budgets, and producing fantastic images with relatively cheap materials,” Hampton tells The Verge. Many of Hevelin’s zines were hectographed — copied by pressing paper to an inked gelatin pad. The medium produced brilliant purples and blues that can still be seen in some of the illustrations. But it favored cheap, highly acidic paper, and images could fade within hours under direct light. “There are rusty staples, tape — all these material things that make a fanzine a fanzine are also what make them difficult to preserve.” Each zine is photographed page by page as quickly as possible, supported by a specially designed cradle, until it can go back in storage.“

Tags:science fiction fanzines, fanzines, digital preservation, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)

morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1KwfyWl at September 04, 2015 at 08:10PM

Cushing Library Releases Digitized Media Fanzine Collection:

aka-arduinna:

marthawells:

Cushing Memorial Library and Archives is pleased to announce that it is now able to offer free, limited online public access to select titles in the Sandy Hereld Memorial Digitized Media Fanzine Collection. Since the collection was first initiated in 2013, access to its materials was previously restricted to only those with a Texas A&M-approved ID until additional permissions could be obtained from the fanzine creators who contributed to the collection.

As the collection becomes more of an important resource for understanding the development of fandom, Cushing Library sought the approval from writers and editors of the Hereld Collection to make their contributions publicly accessible. The collection, which is an unparalleled assembly of media fanworks that document generations of fans’ continued creative engagement with media productions, consists of thousands of digitized images of media fanzines, letterzines, and club newsletters — dating from the late 1960s through materials published online or in print in 2015.

Among the creators who have given their permission are Morgan Dawn, Janet Quarton, Sheila Clark, Devra Michele Langsam, Jacqueline Lichtenberg, and M. Fae Glasgow. Cushing Library anticipates that public access will continue to grow as more authorization is granted.

A few of the impressive productions chronicled particularly well in the Hereld Collection are: Beauty and the Beast (1987-1990), Blake’s 7, Doctor Who, The Professionals, Star Trek, Star Wars, and Starsky & Hutch. Additions to the collection continue steadily, with fanzines relating to numerous other productions, such as the Harry Potter book/movie series, Due South, Miami Vice, Simon & Simon, and many others, including a bevy of stories from multiple fandoms.

Sandy Hereld, for which the collection is named after, is a living, digital tribute to a popular and prolific fan writer in the 1990s and early 2000s — who was also one of slash fandom’s most visible fans. Hereld lost her battle with cancer in 2011, but her legacy of work continues to touch lives and inspire fans. She was the founder of Virgule-L, the first Internet slash mailing list, began hosting numerous other mailing lists and fan sites, and helped create the annual “Vid Review” panel at the Escapade convention, which is the longest-running slash fan convention and became the model for serious conversations about vidding as an art form.

The Sandy Hereld Memorial Digitized Media Fanzine Collection can be accessed at: http://ift.tt/1Uy9uvS.

Wow, Sandy would be so happy to see this. This is fantastic.

(whistles innocently)

This is the correct URL:  http://ift.tt/1Uy9uvS

Sandy’s paper collection is at the University of Iowa (along without thousands and thousands of zines.) Although the paper zines cannot be checked out or loaned through the inter-library system, the Iowa Fanzine Archives special collection is open to the public. If you or a friend wants to donate zines from their collections, contact the OTW’s Open Doors team.

Texas A&M University has a smaller paper collection (but growing and still accepting donations). They have also launched this digital collection which has been named after Sandy Hereld.  Only a teeny fraction of the digitized fanzines in the collection can be made available to the public for now.

TAMU also has started collecting filk in case anyone is looking for a home for their collection.


Tags:university of iowa, texas a&m university, fanzine archives, fanzines, Sandy Hereld Memorial Digitized Media Fanzine Collection, to infinity and beyond, fandom history, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1NSXfLl at September 04, 2015 at 02:31PM

The Archives Corps:

libraryjournal:

Meet the man behind a new effort to save documents and other artifacts before they disappear.

The result of this one project is the formation of Archive Corp. Basically, if you ever want to help save history, sign up and they will email about specific projects.

“Jason Scott has something of a reputation. He’s a historian who works for the Internet Archive, and he’s known in some circles as the guy who can save bits of history right before they disappear.So when he found out that a small store in Maryland that sold manuals for machinery was going out of business, and was going to get rid of its collection of nearly 200,000 obscure booklets in just a few days, Scott got to work….

“….Volunteers came from all over, Scott says. A whole family came through, a grandfather, daughter and granddaughter, who were all put to work. “There was one guy, he basically hitched a ride with a friend from Northern Virginia and went to this warehouse with no plan for where he was going to stay or how he was going to get home, just went and sorted manuals every day for three days. We had to shut the lights on him, he didn’t want to leave.”

ARCHIVE CORPS is a volunteer effort to organize the saving of physical materials in danger of loss. If this sounds at all interesting, please mailsignup@archivecorps.org to be informed of future activity 

Internet Archive

http://ift.tt/1b87kzv


Tags:preservation, archives, volunteering, internet archive, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Xr7FoD at September 04, 2015 at 11:52AM
The new tumblr update removing threaded comments also strips away all comment markers when it is cross-posted to DW. This means that all comments will appear attributed  to the first poster and there are no markers identifying responses etc. You have to manually add names and dividers.

It also strips away hyperlinks (I think)

Tags:DWCrosspost, tumblr tools, tumblr
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1NfKDOv at September 04, 2015 at 11:44AM

transformativeworks:

tabithadarlingsbedroomfloor:

Fanfic, and slash fiction in particular, is a huge part of SF fandom history – and its overlapping communities have mostly been built and shared by women.

Diane Marchant is generally regarded as the writer of the first published fic featuring Kirk/Spock – the ship which popularised slashfic as a fan phenonenon. And she was Australian, to boot!

You’re welcome, rest of the world.

The story, “A Fragment Out of Time,” published in Grup #3 in 1974, contained a steamy sex scene but named no names (and played the pronoun game, so it wasn’t even clearly marked out as a m/m relationship).

Still, the piece was illustrated with a Kirk & Spock picture drawn by Diane, making her intentions fairly obvious, and a cartoon underneath the final page of the story shows Bones saying to Kirk: “Impossible….. No, Jim. I warned you about messing with aliens…….. especially Vulcans.” (The look on Kirk’s face in the cartoon implies he has just been told about the existence of slash fiction. Oh, sweetie.)

Keep reading

Slash fans have been vocal in their support of LGBTQ+ civil rights and representation in media, causes which have seen significant advancement in recent years.  And Kirk/Spock was one of the first modern slash pairings.  Read more about slash on fanlore!

I remember when I finally got a copy of the 2 page story and realized that the art added an additional layer of meaning to the story.  Up to that point, none of articles about the story had ever mentioned the art and the clear signal is was sending [SLASH!!!]  which is why I added the info to Fanlore. One of the many reasons to include as much as we can about the original source text. 


Tags:fandom history, star trek history, slash history, DWCrosspost, fanlore, kirk/spock

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1LUVDjM at September 02, 2015 at 11:03AM

“The ongoing debate about Tumblr vs Livejournal is like a fan with a hammer arguing with a fan with screwdriver over who is better at building a waterbed.”
~xlorp (via meeedeee)

subtleaccordions said: and it also repeats every single argument raised in platform vs platform for the last twenty years… *groans*

Nods in agreement. Of course that it is like every other previous platform debate sometimes obscures the fact that we should be debating how the technology platforms work, which are better suited for X purpose, why we might want to invest in something different, and the ways that the platforms are changing how we interact with one another. Are these changes something we want to embrace? Resist? Ignore and get back to writing more MPREG RPS?   Or how about discussing who owns the platforms that we’ve adopted and whether their interests are aligned with ours? 

The fact is,  we often cannot even get to these issues because we keep getting stuck in that binary: X Good. Y Bad. 

Well I am here to tell you: no one is sleeping in that waterbed until we put the damn tools down and start thinking.


Tags:fandom meta, livejournal, tumblr, how does one respond to a comment on tumblr, I had to reblog my own post to add a response to subtleaccordions, DWCrosspost

Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Default)
Posted in full at: http://ift.tt/1Q6n4WD at September 01, 2015 at 07:41AM
(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-XrRQf7BPM)

Tags:The analog world, graphic design, DWCrosspost
Tumblr post (this is likely a reblog, and may have more pictures over there)
morgandawn: (Art Noveau Blue)
  1. Create an IFTT account

2. Click on this "Recipe" to start posting from Tumblr to either Dreamwidth or Livejournal (note: on Livejournal you need to have a Paid Journal to use this method)
3. In the "Single Tag" section add the Trigger Tag you will apply to Tumblr entries. This tag will tell the Recipe when to cross-post to Dreamwidth. 
If you want to send all Tumblr posts to Dreamwidth or Livejournal use this recipe instead.
4. In the "To Address" add the "Post to Dreamwidth/Livejournal By Email" address. This address will include a PIN Code. On Dreamwidth you can find the address + pincode that you can find here and here. On Livejournal the info is here (note: on LJ you will need a paid account to post by email)
5. Click the "Add" button
6. Go to the Recipe and click "Publish".
7. Exit IFTT
8. Go to tumblr and write your post. Don't forget to add the Trigger Tag to your post
9. If the post does not appear on your tumblr within 30 minutes, try logging back into IFTT, Open up the recipe and click "Check Now"

Notes: your DW/LJ will have all the features of a regular post - if you use an age content restriction as a default, it will have one applied.  If you gave set your posts to be Friends Locked by default, it will be locked etc Some images and video embeds may not show up, so you may want to include a clickable link to the video or image. And last, the date of your DW post may be advanced depending on the dates being used by Tumblr servers.  In my case it advances the post date by 8 hours.
Second Note: your hyperlinks will be stripped and if the reblog has numerous comments, the dividers will be removed.  All comments lumped into one post attributed to the original poster. I would not use this method to cross-post discussion type reblogs or reblogs with commentary.

Instructions on the Reverse Method: Posting From Dreamwidth/Livejournal to Tumblr.

morgandawn: (Ariel Yes?)
 I need fans with both DW and tumblr accounts to help test the cross-posting recipe and work flow 

Context here

Detailed instructions here
morgandawn: (Default)
 1. Create an IFTT account

2. Click on this "Recipe" to start posting from Dreamwidth to Tumblr
3. In the "Keyword or simple phrase" section add the Trigger Tag you will apply to Dreamwidth entriesl. This tag will tell the Recipe when to cross-post to tumblr. 
If you want to send all Dreamwidth posts to tumblr use this recipe instead.
4. In the "Feed URL" add the RSS Feed of your Dreamwidth Journal (BTW, this works with LiveJournal  - just substitute the LJ RSS feed.  
Your DW RSS feed will be something like: http://NameOfMyAwesomeDWJournal.dreamwidth.org/data/rss
5. In the "Body" box change all the placeholder DW Journal names to the name of your DW Journal. There are 3 places where you must do this (see graphic below)
6. In the "Tags" box add a tag that you'd like to appear on your tumblr post. Ex: fandom meta or "Dreamwidth Crosspost"
7. Click the "Add" button
8. Go to the Recipe and click "Publish".
9. Exit IFTT
10. Check your Dreamwidth RSS Feed Settings here: (look under Syndication Level)
If you only want the title of your DW post top appear with a link back, use "Title Only"
If you want only a portion of your DW post to appear with a link back, use "Brief Summary"
If you want your entire DW post to appear on Tumblr use "Full Text"
11. Create your DW post. Don't forget to use the Trigger Tag you added to the IFTT Recipe. If you have set an age limit on your DW posts, you may need to remove it if you have selected the Full or Partial RSS Feed option.
12. If the post does not appear on your tumblr within 30 minutes, try logging back into IFTT, Open up the recipe and click "Check Now"

Direct Link To Image


Instructions on the Reverse Method - Posting from Tumblr To Dreamwidth or Livejournal

Profile

morgandawn: (Default)
morgandawn

September 2017

S M T W T F S
      1 2
3 4 56 7 89
101112131415 16
17 18 19 20212223
24252627282930

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Page Summary

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags